Stay up to date with my posts!

Decoding the Vatican Dress Code: A Comprehensive Guide for Women
Crack the Code: Your Ultimate Guide to Twin Peaks Dress Code
Chick-fil-A Dress Code: Everything You Need to Know
Summer Chic Dress Code: Your Ultimate Guide to Stylish and Comfortable Attire
Middle School Dress Code: A Comprehensive Guide for Students and Parents
Rand Paul's Dress Code: A Guide to Senatorial Style and Professionalism
Royal Caribbean Formal Night Dress Code: Your Ultimate Guide
Broadway Show Dress Code: What to Wear for a Night at the Theater
Grand Hotel Mackinac Island Dress Code: A Comprehensive Guide
Nova SD Dress Code: Everything You Need to Know

How Jewel Has Made Her Life Her Best Work Yet

[ad_1]

If you grew up in the ’90s, chances are you are very familiar with the Grammy-nominated singer-songwriter Jewel. In 1995, she released her twelve-times platinum-selling debut album, Pieces of You, with hits like Who Will Save Your Soul and You Were Meant For Me — instantly becoming a musical icon of the generation. She then went on to have a multi-decade career with twelve studio albums, for which she’s sold over 30 million copies worldwide, that span over a range of genres like Folk, Pop, Country, Children’s, and more. And now, she is gearing up to debut her first studio album in seven years on April 15th, Freewheelin’ Woman, which has become highly anticipated. 

Throughout the years, Jewel has added a few more accolades to her name, including New York Times bestselling author and mental health advocate. Her path to success as a singer-songwriter was not always glamorous; it brought an obstacle course of challenging moments, leading her to find solutions and tools to overcome them. Jewel found her footing through mindfulness, meditation, and an awareness of mental health at a young age, and learned to call on that toolkit throughout navigating the extreme highs and lows that came her way. Beyond her work or stardom, she’s crystal clean that her first priority be becoming the best version of herself. “I don’t want my music to be my best work of art, I want to be my best work of art, I want my life to be my best work of art,” she admits on Second Life. 

[ad_2]

Source link

Please follow and like us:
Scroll to Top